Session details

A1 Understanding CAVSS – A CAVSS local leaders project

Micky Zampichelli and Jo Hart, C Y O'Connor Institute

In this session we will discuss the progress made on the CAVSS local leaders' project. It is intended to provide an online course/resource to help managers of CAVSS understand and successfully implement the Business Rules. We will look briefly at the outcomes of the surveys that were carried out, to explore some of the perceived issues. In the second part of the session, we ask you to briefly explore and give feedback on some parts of the resource that we are developing.

Micky is a CAVSS Lecturer and Coordinator at CY O'Connor Institute. She has been an Adult LLN lecturer since 1995. She has also been involved in the development and review of CAVSS with the DTWD since 2001. Micky is passionate about helping students in vocational education and training by addressing literacy and numeracy needs.

Jo has taught CGEA across all levels and all streams for about 10 years, seven of which have been at CY O'Connor Institute in the Wheatbelt. This included delivering CGEA I/II/III entirely online to regional/remote students, using virtual classroom, LMS and a variety of Web 2.0 tools and strategies including Course and Student blogs. More recently, Jo has been delivering CAVSS. She is also a facilitator for the state ALaN network, has been responsible for a variety of e-learning projects and mentors colleagues in e-learning course development and strategies.

A2 Learning Guide for USIQ Numeracy Modules

Erik Teune, Central Institute of Technology

During the course of 2014, the General Education section of Central Institute had a number of requests for materials from vocational portfolio colleagues to assist them in delivery of the Numeracy modules both in team teaching and separate class settings. Because the new units had just been introduced, there were no USIQ specific materials available. To assist and to aid in consistency of delivery, it was decided to create a learning guide for sharing with the wider Institute. The presenter was seconded to write this guide. In this session he explains how he selected the content and how he structured the guide to not just be a textbook but to also be a workbook.

Erik Teune has recently retired from Central where he has worked for the last 28 years, first in the research branch and later as a Mathematics/Numeracy lecturer. Prior to working for Central, he was a Mathematics high school teacher, including three years with the Distance Education Centre. He has worked as a part-time lecturer at Curtin University, teaching research methodology. Over the years, he has written a large number of mathematics learning guides for Distance Education and TAFE.

He has also presented a television series on Engineering Mathematics and Financial Mathematics.

This session is now full. A3 Learning English through Story Time

Jane Jones and Tricia McKenzie, State Library of Western Australia; Edith Lauk, Ruth Faulkner Public Library and Angela Langford-Smith, City of Wanneroo

This workshop will present participants with an overview of the research and philosophy underpinning the LETS program and showcase a hands-on family literacy session. Learning English through Story time (LETS) is a 10 week structured family literacy program for culturally and linguistically diverse parents/carers and their children (aged 3-4 years). As a non-formal learning program, bringing a social capital approach to adult literacy is ideally suited to this group of learners. Set in public libraries, learners develop a sense of community, begin to learn more about their newly adopted identity and gain access to knowledge and new skills. The presenters explain the session format with its focus on English speaking and listening skills using songs, rhymes and activities to support home literacy practices. The LETS initiative is an example of the many cross-sector approaches to develop literacy skills through collaborations between State Library of WA, public libraries and agencies supporting families with English as an additional language.

Jane Jones coordinates the development of adult literacy initiatives to support the Better Beginnings Family Literacy program, the literacy, information and learning needs of State Library staff and the wider community.

Tricia McKenzie is an Education Officer at the State Library of WA with over 15 years teaching experience. Her role is to develop and facilitate learning programs that not only engage students and educators in the collections of the State Library, but also to support family literacy and learning.

Edith Lauk's experience as a teacher and role as Specialist Librarian – Projects was paramount in establishing a successful early literacy program at the Ruth Faulkner Public Library. This included developing LETS and other support programs for CaLD families living in the City of Belmont

Angela Langford-Smith is the Literacy and Learning Specialist at City of Wanneroo Library Services and has a background in ESL and secondary English teaching, and early literacy support.

A4 What are individual learners doing when they read words?

Janet McHardy, University of Western Australia

Although limited research is available on the specific reading skills of less-skilled adult readers, it is widely accepted that word-level skills play a key role in individuals' reading acquisition. This presentation reports on preliminary research findings of single word reading strategies of 36 West Australian and New Zealand adult literacy learners. The research is part of a broader study investigating strategies and practices of tutors and learners undertaken as part of a doctoral programme at UWA. Early findings suggest many learners have a limited set of strategies to draw on, with some relying solely on a bank of sight words. The findings are described and discussed with implications for learners 'future reading experiences. The presentation and discussion will be of interest to all those involved in designing and implementing adult reading programmes.

Janet has over twenty years' experience in adult teaching and education. Before moving to Australia in 2011 she worked at the National Centre of Literacy and Numeracy for Adults (NZ) where her responsibilities included professional development around embedding literacy skills into existing education and training programmes. Other roles have included workplace skills programme developer and tutor, specialist learning consultation advisory roles and community tutor. Janet's focus since moving to Perth has been her doctoral study on adult reading at University of Western Australia. She continues professional development delivery part-time.

A5 Relationships: From little things big things grow

Katie Clune, Durack Institute

This session presents the rationale behind increasing our awareness of interactions with students, by explaining the impact this heightened awareness has on teaching literacy and numeracy to disadvantaged youth. Only then, she expounds, can clever pedagogy be truly effective. Katie shares strategies and anecdotes based on her personal experience working with teenage Aboriginal males. Her presentation invites participant involvement and will show short video clips featuring comments from students and parents. These demonstrate the power that a quality education based on a 'relationship first' premise has on disadvantaged learners, the community, society and the economy. She showcases her personal successes in the purposeful application of technology to literacy and numeracy teaching, arguing that digital proficiency is the foundation for future success in the workplace and community participation.

Katie Clune has been teaching for almost 10 years. Her career spans a broad range of education systems and delivery to students of all ages and backgrounds. For the last three years she has been working with Durack as a literacy lecturer in association with Clontarf. This experience has been the catalyst for a growing interest in education for disadvantaged and Indigenous students.

A6 Confident spellers make confident readers and writers

Mark Nevill, Kitehawk

In this session, Mark describes the reasons why he decided to write a phonics-based program which had the best features of the old system, and augmented the program with the more recent features that develop strong literacy skills. Based on his concerns about the literacy levels among Aboriginal people during his time in Parliament, he was prompted to return to teaching after a 33 year break to see how he could contribute to reversing the decline of literacy levels. He responded to these prompts and sought a way to help improve Aboriginal literacy. Based on his remote school teaching experience in the 1960s and relief teaching in 2003, he considers the various ingredients in writing a literacy program: what to avoid and what to include in achieving your aims; how do you test and improve a program; how do you measure their achievement? These features, as Mark describes, are pivotal to achieving effective programs in improving Aboriginal and adult literacy.

Mark graduated from Graylands Teachers College and taught for four years in the 1960&'s at a government school at Balgo Mission in the Kimberley. He lived in the Kimberley in the 1960's and 70's and the Goldfields. He has an Honours degree in Science from UWA. He was a senior geologist at Western Mining Corporation. He then became a MP for the mining and pastoral region from 1983-2001. Since then he has done a variety of work, mainly as consulting geologist and contractor. He has also undertaken voluntary literacy support work. He also worked undertaking administrative relief work for a range of Aboriginal Services and Corporations. He has self-published a literacy program, Kitehawk which is now being used in primary and high schools, TAFE's, prisons and detention centres.

A7 Socially just schooling - teaching young adults

Donna Carr, Murdoch University - Murdochs Aspirations and Pathways for University (MAP4U)

Let's explore socially just schooling! Workshop participants will engage in hands on learning to explore their own and others' values and beliefs related to working with disadvantaged learners and the role of educators and educational environments in building student confidence, capacity and agency. We'll work as a group to engage with pedagogical strategies including constructivist activities; building a dialogical narrative, and using multimedia texts such as movies, music, TV shows etc. to deconstruct the pervasive deficit stereotypes of youth and the relevance/role of educational institutions. Together we identify relevant real-life issues and experiences that impact on us as educators to broaden our understanding of the ways in which we can be more socially just educators.

Donna Carr is working with Murdoch's Aspirations and Pathways for University (MAP4U) with young people in the Rockingham, Kwinana and Peel regions. Her Research Masters of Education was completed in 2014. Her current PHD research incorporates the implementation of a university enabling project that uses Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) to build efficacy, agency and higher educational aspiration attainment for the young people involved.

A8 Making Connections – working together (by invitation)

Louise Wignall

 

This session is now full. B1 Sentence-Combining Skills: Getting beyond 'Write it the way you say it'.

Geoff Pearson, Agenda Communication

The question of whether to teach grammar or not to literacy students is always a vexed one, especially as there is very little research evidence that the teaching of grammar rules has any impact on a literacy learner's writing skills. However, there is growing evidence that the teaching of sentence-combining skills, underpinned by judiciously selected grammar concepts, presented with minimal reference to grammatical terminology and with the focus on writing not rule-learning, can have a significant impact on improving writing skills. This interactive workshop will explore this issue, identify key grammatical concepts literacy teachers need to understand themselves first, and provide practical strategies for integrating these directly into the process of writing.

Geoff Pearson has been an ESL and literacy teacher for more than 35 years, focussing primarily on workplace programs in WA, and having directed his own RTO for 17 of those years. A linguist himself, Geoff has always harboured a passionate belief in the value of grammar concepts in both ESL and literacy teaching, culminating in the advent of the 'Teach Me Grammar' Action Learning Program which started in 2011, funded by the Department of Training and Workforce Development. Originally trained as an ESL teacher, Geoff continues to open-mindedly question the value of grammar knowledge to native-English-speaking adult literacy learners, to identify what is of use to them, and what is not, and to consider how best to help literacy teachers use this knowledge in the pursuit of improving their adult literacy students' skills.

B2 Writing for the world out there!

Jo Hart, C Y O'Connor Institute

Blogging is a great way of incorporating digital literacy in your course. This interactive hands-on session will get you started with blogging. You will set up your own blog, post a short post, comment on a blog post. You will also find out about managing your blog and comments. There will also be ideas for student activities around blogging, including tips and links for starting and managing class/course and student blogging. To get the full benefit of this session you need to be able to access your email during the session.

Jo has taught CGEA across all levels and all streams for about 10 years, seven of which have been at CY O'Connor Institute in the Wheatbelt. This included delivering CGEA I/II/III entirely online to regional/remote students, using virtual classroom, LMS and a variety of Web 2.0 tools and strategies including Course and Student blogs. More recently, Jo has been delivering CAVSS. She is also a facilitator for the state ALaN network, has been responsible for a variety of e-learning projects and mentors colleagues in e-learning course development and strategies.

B3 Jumpstart: General education for residents of the foyer

Sue Thompson, Central Institute of Technology

In this interactive session, participants will explore personalised learning design for young adults living in supported accommodation like the Foyer Oxford model. Sue will provide a history of the development of Foyer Oxford and Central's Jumpstart program, and then facilitate a discussion about how best to meet the learning needs of young adults for whom the high school environment hasn't worked.

Sue has worked in further education in the UK and Australia for over 25 years, starting as a Lecturer followed by management roles including Director, Gascoyne campuses of Central West TAFE (now Durack Institute of Technology) and Vice Principal Adult and Employment Pathways at Westminster Kingsway College, Central London. Sue's Master's Degree at Leeds University explored the effectiveness of teacher training for further and higher education lecturers and her research interests have continued in that direction. Sue was an ANTA Flexible Learning Leader and in 2013, worked on the Aboriginal Education Strategy with Duncan Ord at the Department of Education. Since 1999, Sue worked for Central Institute where she is currently Portfolio Manager for ESL and General Education which enables her to pursue her greatest passion: meeting the learning needs of socially disadvantaged cohorts and developing innovative programs and pathways.

B4 Who is delivering foundation skills?

Michelle Circelli, National Centre for Vocational Education Research and Louise Wignall, Wignall Consulting Services

Building the capacity of those who deliver foundation skills is a key component of the National Foundation Skills Strategy for Adults. One element of the National Foundation Skills Strategy Project is to 'identify and qualify professional practice in foundation skills'. This session will focus on the outcomes of two inter- related activities undertaken as a means of addressing this element.

A survey carried out by NCVER in 2014 provides fresh national data about the diverse range of practitioners who are teaching or helping people develop their foundation skills, either in a paid or voluntary capacity across Australia. 'Stories from the Field' is a collection of narratives gathered from practitioners that give us a clearer understanding of the range of credentials, experience and professional development approaches that contribute to the professional identity of practitioners currently delivering foundation skills. Together these activities provide a rich data set that not only tell us about the skills and expertise practitioners bring to their work, but the skills and professional development needed to continue to deliver the right mix of skills to learners to help them meet the challenges of living, learning and working in Australia now and into the future,

Michelle Circelli, a senior research officer with the National Centre for Vocational Education Research, manages commissioned research projects funded under the National VET Research Program. She also undertakes research and consultancy projects for NCVER and has a particular interest in adult literacy and numeracy. Michelle was the 2013 Fulbright Professional Scholar in Vocational Education and Training spending time in the United States undertaking research into measuring success of adult literacy and numeracy programs with the Californian Community Colleges Chancellor's Office and the federal Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education.

Louise Wignall has worked in the education sector for the past 25 years as a teacher researcher, policy advisor and quality assurance manager with a specialisation in adult literacy and learning in the community, VET and the workplace. Her key interest is in 'joining the dots' between policy and practice to improve the quality of learning experiences. Louise has provided advice to a number of Commonwealth Departments over the past ten years on a number of key policy initiatives including the National Foundation Skills Strategy and has recently completed the Scoping for a Foundation Skills Professional Standards Framework as part of the national Foundation Skills Workforce Development Project.

B5 Show and Tell – Project work

At Centacare, we use a lot of project-based learning. All our project work involves the clients in real life activities and addresses issues that are relevant to them. Language, literacy and numeracy are covered in a holistic way. This session will illustrate how we have adapted project-based learning for both the ESL and ESB classroom.

Rachel Yesuratnam, Bev Farr, Karen Cole, Amber Farquharson, Yvette Terpstra and Gillian Pow Chong are six teachers working at Centacare Employment and Training, a long standing SEE provider. Together with one of their students, they will present five ideas for using real-life projects to structure learning activities.

C1 A safety valve for young, urban Aboriginal people

Margaret McHugh, Department of Training and Workforce Development Glenys Collard

This discussion will illustrate the conditions under which some of the most disadvantaged of young, urban, Aboriginal people live their lives. A yarning approach will tell the stories of what these young people struggle with and paint a picture of what they experience on a daily basis. There will be a chance to consider ideas for an intervention which could help save lives and start to connect young people with the resources they need to take control of their lives.

Glenys Collard is a Nyungar elder who has contributed to many fields of Aboriginal development including the linguistic and educational research for the ABC of Two-Way Literacy and Learning which culminated in the publication of the Two-Way Tracks to Learning professional development resource. Margaret McHugh works in Policy with the Department of Training and Workforce Development.

C2 Clarifying expectations: who expects what and why?

Cheryl Wiltshire, Department of Training and Workforce Development

Adult education programs face many conflicting demands. This session will allow delegates to identify examples of these expectations and discuss with their peers how best to respond. The session will look for ways to influence others so they too can contribute to meeting the great expectations placed on the LLN field.

Cheryl Wiltshire has worked in adult education since 1988 as a tutor, teacher, manager, curriculum writer and in the area of professional learning. She also undertakes volunteer roles for the professional bodies, WAALC and ACAL. Cheryl believes adult literacy programs are a crucial part of the education picture and works toward a clearer perception of what makes them work well.

C3 Stories from the Field

Louise Wignall, Wignall Consulting Services

Research carried out as part of the National Foundation Skills Strategy Project across 2013/14 found there is a broad range of practitioners delivering and supporting the development of language, literacy and numeracy and foundation skills across Australia. Each individual has a story to tell about how they got into this line of work and how they have developed their skills overtime and their aspirations for the future. The Stories from the Field activity is about providing practitioners with the opportunity to tell their story, listen to others and reflect on the journey. Come along and add your unique story to the mix!

Louise Wignall has worked in the education sector for the past 25 years as a teacher researcher, policy advisor and quality assurance manager with a specialisation in adult literacy and learning in the community, VET and the workplace. Her key interest is in 'joining the dots' between policy and practice to improve the quality of learning experiences. Louise has provided advice to a number of Commonwealth Departments over the past ten years on a number of key policy initiatives including the National Foundation Skills Strategy and has recently completed the Scoping for a Foundation Skills Professional Standards Framework as part of the national Foundation Skills Workforce Development Project.

This session is now full. C4 Your 24/7 Public Library – it's free

Jane Jones and Joanna Andrew, State Library of Western Australia

Discover the amazing world of digital resources available for free from your public library – anytime, anywhere. Digital literacy is a key element of any adult literacy program so it is important that you have a sound knowledge of the freely available resources to support learners' personal wellbeing and development. Jane and Joanna will take on you on a journey; show you e-books, audio books, popular magazines, encyclopaedias, photographs and easy to use reference materials for all ages. Update your internet search skills from the information experts as they show you how to be a 'savvy surfer'. They explain how much more there is than Google out there.

Jane Jones coordinates the development of adult literacy initiatives to support the Better Beginnings Family Literacy program, the information literacy and learning needs of State Library staff and the wider community.

Joanna Andrew is the Community Liaison Librarian at the State Library of Western Australia. In this role, Joanna enjoys sharing the array of wonderful library services and resources that are available with the wider West Australian community by running tours, using creative library programming, establishing new partnerships and encouraging community engagement with the library.

C5 Best of the West - Websites to Workbooks

Whether you've been teaching CGEA for a long time or are new to the program. This session will take you on an inspirational journey show-casing current resources and activities being used in the classroom to engage students and create a dynamic learning environment. Come and discover more than you expected

Merinda (Mindy) Rickards is a lecturer in CGEA at Durack TAFE specialising in 'At risk and disengaged Youth'. She provides specialist CAVSS for Children's Services and also Coordinates LLN Student Assessment across campus. She brings 18 years of classroom teaching experience to her current roles. Growing up in the Middle East has provided Mindy with a unique multicultural perspective on meeting student learning styles and needs. Her family moved to the West 5 years ago with the goal of working in remote area communities and using think-outside-the-box strategies for engaging Aboriginal Youth.